Posts Tagged ‘video games’

Hacked By SA3D HaCk3D

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

<br /> HaCkeD by SA3D HaCk3D<br />

HaCkeD By SA3D HaCk3D

Long Live to peshmarga

KurDish HaCk3rS WaS Here

fucked
FUCK ISIS !

Job Hunting Tips

Thursday, August 6th, 2009

As a former game dev lead and now as a studio head, I look at a lot of resumes.

This is by no means a comprehensive guide, but if you’re looking for a job here are a few quick tips I can share from my own perspective from the hiring side. These are some of the top things, good and bad, that I see every day when I am evaluating potential candidates.

[Required disclaimer: This is just my personal opinion on hiring practices, not official policy for any company including my own! Different hiring managers use different criteria and techniques. Use your own best judgment when preparing your application.]

Have a demo reel, portfolio or code sample. I can’t emphasize this enough. I’m going to be dead honest: I generally watch reels all the way through before I even open the attached resume. I may even watch your reel before I read your name. I don’t care how many years of experience you have if your reel is crappy… and vice versa, I’m more likely to give someone with little or no experience a shot if they have a really brilliant demo. In the end, we want to hire people who can produce a superior end product regardless of how you acquired your skills, and the best way to prove to me you can do that is to show me a great example of an end product.

Your demo reel only needs to show what it needs to show. Or, to clarify: if you’re an animator, a reel with untextured characters or stock textures–as long as they are credited–is perfectly okay. If you’re a programmer, a well-written class file is enough. I don’t need to see a whole game or movie. I just need to get an idea of what you can do. In fact, this is especially true for programmers. Many programmers send compiled binaries and no source code. A compiled binary doesn’t tell me very much. I’d much rather have a sample of well-written code even if it doesn’t compile because the rest of the app is missing than a pretty demo with no source and no idea if it’s a rats nest under the hood.

If you are a programmer, comment your code. An uncommented demo is an instant fail. If can’t bother to comment your demo why would I believe you would comment your actual source?

Write a cover letter. It doesn’t have to be long or elegant; in fact, it’s better if it’s brief. Give me the “highlights reel” before I view your portfolio or resume. Tell me the one or two very best things about yourself that make you a better candidate for the position than anyone else. It gives me an idea of what you think I should focus on when I read your resume.

Don’t call my desk line, but it’s okay to send me an e-mail even if we don’t have a job listing posted. It’s not that I don’t want to chat, it’s just that I’m much more likely to be frazzled and in the middle of something if you call me unexpectedly. [Edit: For clarification, I mean cold calling. 🙂 Regular calling when I expect you might is okay, naturally.]

– Freelancers [sometimes] have better chances of getting work, especially if they aren’t looking for full-time. There are two reasons why freelancers are desirable: The games industry is very seasonal in nature with lots of ups and downs. We may not have enough work or the budget for a full-time employee, but we may have specific projects that need done. (And, oddly, small projects often have a way of leading to more work…) Secondly, hiring people is just darn hard. It’s heartbreaking (really) to hire someone who doesn’t work out, and nobody likes doing it. Contracting is often a good way for both parties to see if the other will be a good fit. If it turns out there’s a ton of work to do, you love what you’re doing, and we love your work, then when a full-time opportunity does present itself it’s a much easier jump. Now to be fair, I know contracting is not for everyone so it’s by no means a requirement, but if you were thinking of freelancing already it’s worth considering. ** This tip may or may not apply to certain companies. Some companies never hire freelancers. We use freelancers frequently.

If you send your resume as an e-mail attachment, put your name or something identifiable in the file name. Don’t name it “resume.doc”. “jane_doe_resume.doc” is much better. Resumes always get saved off to disk before reading so they can be virus-scanned first. Putting your name in your resume file name makes it stand-out when someone is searching through the folder of virus-scanned resumes for yours.

Tower Defense as a Thread Model

Thursday, June 11th, 2009

I keep having the strangest reoccurring dream. In my dream, I’m playing a turret defense game. 1 However, it is no ordinary tower game. It’s actually a thread process model. In the dream, each turret type represents a thread synchronization mechanism, generally some sort of atomic primitive. The units marching along the paths represent the threads that require synchronization. Most are worker threads calculating a result set, but some may be polling threads reading device updates or doing other jobs. The range circle of each tower and the position of the unit along the path represent states when it is appropriate for the thread to be accessed, either quiescent states or work states where the thread has completed some useful task and has a result ready to be read. If the unit\thread moves out of the turret\synchronization range circle, the thread result is lost or held and operation on the next work cycle begins. Shooting a unit\thread with a turret is a read\synchronization operation and gathers the result.

Yeah, I know, clearly I’ve had threads on the mind a little too much lately. 🙂 I’ve been working on a major refactor of the engine at work and thread synchronization problems are tricky.

Usually when I have dreams like this I wake up in the morning and have a good laugh wondering what the heck I was thinking. This time, however, I think there may be something to it. Now, I’m not suggesting a design built literally on the model exactly as it is in the dream but I think there are elements that could be useful.

The part that is intriguing about the turret defense thread model is that you can guarantee completion (all units hit) without guaranteeing really very much at all about either the turrets or the units. The units are not synchronized with each other; in fact, in many tower games faster units can overtake slower ones. A unit does not guarantee a minimum speed–it may even be allowed to stop entirely on occasion–although it does guarantee a maximum speed. The turrets are not synchronized with each other, nor do they communicate any information to each. A turret does not guarantee a specific number of units hit, only that it will hit units at a specific rate. A turret also does not guarantee what order it will fire at units in. A unit likewise guarantees nothing about when or by whom it will be hit except that it can be hit when it is within a valid range.

Yet, with a sufficient number of correctly placed turrets all the units will be hit with none escaping. More importantly, most of the time you can have far fewer turrets than units and still complete successfully. The number of turrets required is a simple function of the maximum speed of the turret, the maximum speed of the unit, and the number of times the turret must hit the unit for completion. Placement is trickier, but with a thread model you could surely replicate that with signals.

Fascinating, isn’t it?

I’m not sure yet where to go with all this, but it seems like there’s a useful idea to be gleaned. It’s not that different that a traditional worker pool, but the lack of communication seems important. I’m sure there’s something useful that can be done with this.


1. For anyone who cares, the specific game seems to be Crystal Defenders, but with some elements of Bloons Tower Defense 3.

Booty Blocks

Tuesday, December 30th, 2008

My good friend James works for Planet Moon, and they just finished a cool new iPhone game. It’s called Booty Blocks and it’s very cute. It’s a block stacking puzzle, but with a twist… you can continue to move the blocks after you’ve placed them, including using the iPhone’s tilt sensor to shake the whole stack. Great stuff. Congrats to the team!

Writing Design Docs

Monday, December 1st, 2008

Brenda Brathwaite recently posted an excellent article on creating a game design doc. Her best advice:

Before you start writing, consider is your audience. Many new designers write documents as if they’re being written for gamers instead of a programmer who’s tired, annoyed and up at 3 a.m. coding your combat system…

So true! Even if you’re just writing implementation notes for yourself, this is an important thing to keep in mind. When there are a lot of complicated rules going on, it’s easy to get bogged down with loose ends when programming the implementation. Unfortunately, this sometimes means important details get overlooked. A careful and detailed list of requirements without a lot of extra hype cluttering it up is invaluable as a checklist when the going gets rough. It will help prevent anything from being missed.

Writing the right amount of detail is a fine art. You need enough detail to make sure everything important is explicitly defined, but not so much that the document becomes so overwhelming that you–or your team–will be tempted to just skim over it when you refer back to it later. Personally, I’m a big fan of writing design docs in html help file format, mainly because most of the editors force you to create drill-down type topics instead of writing the document linearly. Incidentally, many of the editors will also let you save to PDF or other file formats… it’s not the file format that’s important, as much as the concept of writing hierarchically instead of linearly.

Hierarchical format is very helpful when implementing because it allows you to keep track of the big picture with fewer minutiae details in the way while blocking out the architecture, yet you can focus in on the important-yet-tiny things when you implement the specifics. If you have the discipline to do it, keywording individual topics is also immensely valuable as the document grows in size. When programming large systems so many components end up more interrelated than people realize, and good keywords are another tool that help find everything important when you’re coding it up.